Lamiaceae Thymus vulgaris derivative "Thymol"; natural medical, flavoring, and pesticide uses.

 
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Lamiaceae Thymus vulgaris derivative "Thymol"; natural medical, flavoring, and pesticide uses.

CryptidFlora
https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/thymol#section=EU-Pesticides-Data

As can be seen in this pub chem directory page, Thymol (a natural derivative of thyme herb) has evidence of antimicrobial properties, and is accepted by the EPA for use as a natural fungicide.

It also shows some evidence for anti-inflammatory properties in test mice, in addition to being safe and tasty enough for use as a thyme-flavored food additive.
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Re: Lamiaceae Thymus vulgaris derivative "Thymol"; natural medical, flavoring, and pesticide uses.

Radishrain
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I bought a bottle of thymol over ten years ago. I think I got it for antifungal purposes. It worked better than anything else I had tried at the time (e.g. tea tree oil). It wasn't perfect, but the best thing I tried.
Location: SW Idaho, USA
Climate: BSk
USDA hardiness zone: 6
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Re: Lamiaceae Thymus vulgaris derivative "Thymol"; natural medical, flavoring, and pesticide uses.

CryptidFlora
Huh, good to know. I tried some 7th generation disinfectant wipes recently and I was pleasantly surprised the natural, pleasant smell. I make bath and body products and I would like to start utilizing thymol somehow.
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